Truth Frequency Radio


Jul 11, 2015

thesleuthjournal

guy-builds-shelter-in-woods

In our modern culture it’s rare to find many individuals with the knowledge to survive well should they find themselves lost in the woods or in need of survival skills. Perhaps this is because we think the chances we might ever need to use skills like this are low, or maybe we simply take our lifestyles for granted.  Either way, I do find it interesting to see how many friends I have that don’t even know the first thing about building a fire out in the woods.

In the video below, a man builds an amazing shelter in the woods using only the resources you would find there. Dirt, trees, rocks, and anything else he could find in his immediate surroundings are used to build a home better than many of us might be able to build even if we had access to Home Depot!

Maybe this could be inspiration for us to make sure we learn even the basics like building a fire or hanging food in a tree to keep away from animals. After all, if the time were to come where some of our infrastructures went down or had issues and we needed the basic skills of finding food, water, and shelter, a little woodcraft knowledge could really come in handy.

If anything, just enjoy the sheer skill and creativity this human being has.

https://youtu.be/nCKkHqlx9dE

H/T: SunnySkyz

Primitive Technology I built this hut in the bush using naturally occurring materials and primitive tools. The hut is 2m wide and 2m long, the side walls are 1m high and the ridge line (highest point) is 2m high giving a roof angle of 45 degrees. A bed was built inside and it takes up a little less than half the hut. The tools used were a stone hand axe to chop wood, fire sticks to make fire, a digging stick for digging and clay pots to carry water. The materials used in the hut were wood for the frame, vine and lawyer cane for lashings and mud for daubing. Broad leaves were initially used as thatch which worked well for about four months before starting to rot. The roof was then covered with sheets of paper bark which proved to be a better roofing material. An external fireplace and chimney were also built to reduce smoke inside. The hut is a small yet comfortable shelter and provides room to store tools and materials out of the weather. The whole hut took 9 months from start to finish. But it only took 30 days of actual work (I abandoned it for a few months before adding bark roof, chimney and extra daub ).


By Joe Martino

I created Collective-Evolution (where this article first appeared) 5 years ago and have been heavily at it since. I love inspiring others to find joy and make changes in their lives. Hands down the only other thing I am this passionate about is baseball.

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